Tag Archives: Future Studies

Top 100 Innovation and Transformation Articles of 2022

Top 100 Innovation and Transformation Articles of 2022

2021 marked the re-birth of my original Blogging Innovation blog as a new blog called Human-Centered Change and Innovation.

Many of you may know that Blogging Innovation grew into the world’s most popular global innovation community before being re-branded as InnovationExcellence.com and being ultimately sold to DisruptorLeague.com.

Thanks to an outpouring of support I’ve ignited the fuse of this new multiple author blog around the topics of human-centered change, innovation, transformation and design.

I feel blessed that the global innovation and change professional communities have responded with a growing roster of contributing authors and more than 17,000 newsletter subscribers.

To celebrate we’ve pulled together the Top 100 Innovation and Transformation Articles of 2022 from our archive of over 1,000 articles on these topics.

We do some other rankings too.

We just published the Top 40 Innovation Bloggers of 2022 and as the volume of this blog has grown we have brought back our monthly article ranking to complement this annual one.

But enough delay, here are the 100 most popular innovation and transformation posts of 2022.

Did your favorite make the cut?

1. A Guide to Organizing Innovation – by Jesse Nieminen

2. The Education Business Model Canvas – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

3. 50 Cognitive Biases Reference – Free Download – by Braden Kelley

4. Why Innovation Heroes Indicate a Dysfunctional Organization – by Steve Blank

5. The One Movie All Electric Car Designers Should Watch – by Braden Kelley

6. Don’t Forget to Innovate the Customer Experience – by Braden Kelley

7. What Latest Research Reveals About Innovation Management Software – by Jesse Nieminen

8. Is Now the Time to Finally End Our Culture of Disposability? – by Braden Kelley

9. Free Innovation Maturity Assessment – by Braden Kelley

10. Cognitive Bandwidth – Staying Innovative in ‘Interesting’ Times – by Pete Foley

11. Is Digital Different? – by John Bessant

12. Top 40 Innovation Bloggers of 2021 – Curated by Braden Kelley

13. Can We Innovate Like Elon Musk? – by Pete Foley

14. Why Amazon Wants to Sell You Robots – by Shep Hyken

15. Free Human-Centered Change Tools – by Braden Kelley

16. What is Human-Centered Change? – by Braden Kelley

17. Not Invented Here – by John Bessant

18. Top Five Reasons Customers Don’t Return – by Shep Hyken

19. Visual Project Charter™ – 35″ x 56″ (Poster Size) and JPG for Online Whiteboarding – by Braden Kelley

20. Nine Innovation Roles – by Braden Kelley

21. How Consensus Kills Innovation – by Greg Satell

22. Why So Much Innoflation? – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

23. ACMP Standard for Change Management® Visualization – 35″ x 56″ (Poster Size) – Association of Change Management Professionals – by Braden Kelley

24. 12 Reasons to Write Your Own Letter of Recommendation – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

25. The Five Keys to Successful Change – by Braden Kelley

26. Innovation Theater – How to Fake It ‘Till You Make It – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

27. Five Immutable Laws of Change – by Greg Satell

28. How to Free Ourselves of Conspiracy Theories – by Greg Satell

29. An Innovation Action Plan for the New CTO – by Steve Blank

30. How to Write a Failure Resume – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.


Build a common language of innovation on your team


31. Entrepreneurs Must Think Like a Change Leader – by Braden Kelley

32. No Regret Decisions: The First Steps of Leading through Hyper-Change – by Phil Buckley

33. Parallels Between the 1920’s and Today Are Frightening – by Greg Satell

34. Technology Not Always the Key to Innovation – by Braden Kelley

35. The Era of Moving Fast and Breaking Things is Over – by Greg Satell

36. A Startup’s Guide to Marketing Communications – by Steve Blank

37. You Must Be Comfortable with Being Uncomfortable – by Janet Sernack

38. Four Key Attributes of Transformational Leaders – by Greg Satell

39. We Were Wrong About What Drove the 21st Century – by Greg Satell

40. Stoking Your Innovation Bonfire – by Braden Kelley

41. Now is the Time to Design Cost Out of Our Products – by Mike Shipulski

42. Why Good Ideas Fail – by Greg Satell

43. Five Myths That Kill Change and Transformation – by Greg Satell

44. 600 Free Innovation, Transformation and Design Quote Slides – Curated by Braden Kelley

45. FutureHacking – by Braden Kelley

46. Innovation Requires Constraints – by Greg Satell

47. The Experiment Canvas™ – 35″ x 56″ (Poster Size) – by Braden Kelley

48. The Pyramid of Results, Motivation and Ability – by Braden Kelley

49. Four Paradigm Shifts Defining Our Next Decade – by Greg Satell

50. Why Most Corporate Mindset Programs Are a Waste of Time – by Alain Thys


Accelerate your change and transformation success


51. Impact of Cultural Differences on Innovation – by Jesse Nieminen

52. 600+ Downloadable Quote Posters – Curated by Braden Kelley

53. The Four Secrets of Innovation Implementation – by Shilpi Kumar

54. What Entrepreneurship Education Really Teaches Us – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

55. Reset and Reconnect in a Chaotic World – by Janet Sernack

56. You Can’t Innovate Without This One Thing – by Robyn Bolton

57. Why Change Must Be Built on Common Ground – by Greg Satell

58. Four Innovation Ecosystem Building Blocks – by Greg Satell

59. Problem Seeking 101 – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

60. Taking Personal Responsibility – Back to Leadership Basics – by Janet Sernack

61. The Lost Tribe of Medicine – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

62. Invest Yourself in All That You Do – by Douglas Ferguson

63. Bureaucracy and Politics versus Innovation – by Braden Kelley

64. Dare to Think Differently – by Janet Sernack

65. Bridging the Gap Between Strategy and Reality – by Braden Kelley

66. Innovation vs. Invention vs. Creativity – by Braden Kelley

67. Building a Learn It All Culture – by Braden Kelley

68. Real Change Requires a Majority – by Greg Satell

69. Human-Centered Innovation Toolkit – by Braden Kelley

70. Silicon Valley Has Become a Doomsday Machine – by Greg Satell

71. Three Steps to Digital and AI Transformation – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

72. We need MD/MBEs not MD/MBAs – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

73. What You Must Know Before Leading a Design Thinking Workshop – by Douglas Ferguson

74. New Skills Needed for a New Era of Innovation – by Greg Satell

75. The Leader’s Guide to Making Innovation Happen – by Jesse Nieminen

76. Marriott’s Approach to Customer Service – by Shep Hyken

77. Flaws in the Crawl Walk Run Methodology – by Braden Kelley

78. Disrupt Yourself, Your Team and Your Organization – by Janet Sernack

79. Why Stupid Questions Are Important to Innovation – by Greg Satell

80. Breaking the Iceberg of Company Culture – by Douglas Ferguson


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81. A Brave Post-Coronavirus New World – by Greg Satell

82. What Can Leaders Do to Have More Innovative Teams? – by Diana Porumboiu

83. Mentors Advise and Sponsors Invest – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

84. Increasing Organizational Agility – by Braden Kelley

85. Should You Have a Department of Artificial Intelligence? – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

86. This 9-Box Grid Can Help Grow Your Best Future Talent – by Soren Kaplan

87. Creating Employee Connection Innovations in the HR, People & Culture Space – by Chris Rollins

88. Developing 21st-Century Leader and Team Superpowers – by Janet Sernack

89. Accelerate Your Mission – by Brian Miller

90. How the Customer in 9C Saved Continental Airlines from Bankruptcy – by Howard Tiersky

91. How to Effectively Manage Remotely – by Douglas Ferguson

92. Leading a Culture of Innovation from Any Seat – by Patricia Salamone

93. Bring Newness to Corporate Learning with Gamification – by Janet Sernack

94. Selling to Generation Z – by Shep Hyken

95. Importance of Measuring Your Organization’s Innovation Maturity – by Braden Kelley

96. Innovation Champions and Pilot Partners from Outside In – by Arlen Meyers, M.D.

97. Transformation Insights – by Bruce Fairley

98. Teaching Old Fish New Tricks – by Braden Kelley

99. Innovating Through Adversity and Constraints – by Janet Sernack

100. It is Easier to Change People than to Change People – by Annette Franz

Curious which article just missed the cut? Well, here it is just for fun:

101. Chance to Help Make Futurism and Foresight Accessible – by Braden Kelley

These are the Top 100 innovation and transformation articles of 2022 based on the number of page views. If your favorite Human-Centered Change & Innovation article didn’t make the cut, then send a tweet to @innovate and maybe we’ll consider doing a People’s Choice List for 2022.

If you’re not familiar with Human-Centered Change & Innovation, we publish 1-6 new articles every week focused on human-centered change, innovation, transformation and design insights from our roster of contributing authors and ad hoc submissions from community members. Get the articles right in your Facebook feed or on Twitter or LinkedIn too!

Editor’s Note: Human-Centered Change & Innovation is open to contributions from any and all the innovation & transformation professionals out there (practitioners, professors, researchers, consultants, authors, etc.) who have a valuable insight to share with everyone for the greater good. If you’d like to contribute, contact us.

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The 10 Key Components of Future Studies

The 10 Key Components of Future Studies

GUEST POST from Art Inteligencia

Smart organizations make an investment in the pursuit of future studies as part of their innovation activities. This investment is critical to the ongoing success of an organization because the wants and needs of customers change over time along with what’s possible from a technological, economical, and societal perspective. But many don’t know what future studies or futurology are or choose to focus on short-term profits over long-term viability and success. If you’re not clear on what future studies is, here are ten key components of the science of studying the future:

  1. Scenario Planning: This involves looking at different possible outcomes and understanding the implications of each.
  2. Trend Analysis: This involves looking at the trends in various areas such as politics, technology, and the environment.
  3. Forecasting: This uses models, data, and historical information to predict future events.
  4. Impact Assessment: This involves understanding the potential impact of changes in the environment, society and technology.
  5. System Dynamics: This involves understanding the relationships between different elements of a system and how they might interact and evolve in the future.
  6. Risk Analysis: This involves assessing the potential risks associated with different scenarios.
  7. Trend Monitoring: This involves continuously monitoring trends and changes in the environment, society, and technology.
  8. Technology Assessment: This involves understanding the implications of new technologies and how they might shape the future.
  9. Social Analysis: This involves understanding the social, political, and economic forces that shape our world.
  10. Futures Research: This involves researching and exploring potential futures to better prepare for them.

Breaking down the somewhat ephemeral topic of future studies into these subcomponents can make it not only more tangible, but also more feasible to fund and execute these activities in support of your innovation activities and the continuous renewal of both the relevance and resonance of your organization with its customers.

Bottom line: Futurology is not fortune telling. Futurists use a scientific approach to create their deliverables, but a methodology and tools like those in FutureHacking™ can empower anyone to engage in futurology themselves.

Image credit: Pexels

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Top 5 Future Studies Programs

Top 5 Future Studies Programs

GUEST POST from Art Inteligencia

In the ever-changing world of technology, futurists are needed more than ever. With the help of futurists, companies, governments, and organizations can plan for the future and make better decisions about how to adapt to a rapidly changing world. With the increasing demand for futurists, many universities have begun to offer undergraduate degrees in futurology. Here are the top five undergraduate futurology programs:

1. University of Oxford

The University of Oxford offers an undergraduate Master of Science in Futures Studies, which focuses on the study of complex systems, the analysis of dynamic change, and the development of long-term strategies. This program includes courses such as “Futures Thinking and Practice”, “Futures and the Environment” and “Futures and Society”.

2. University of Sussex

The University of Sussex offers an undergraduate degree in Futures Studies. This program focuses on the study of trends and events in the world, and how to anticipate and prepare for these changes. Courses in this program include “Futures Thinking”, “Theories and Techniques of Futures Studies”, and “Futures Analysis and Practice”.

3. University of Calgary

The University of Calgary offers an undergraduate Major in Futures Studies. This program focuses on the study of global and regional issues, and how to anticipate and prepare for them. Courses in this program include “Global Futures”, “Risk and Resilience”, and “Futures Thinking and Planning”.

4. University of Toronto

The University of Toronto offers an undergraduate Minor in Futures Studies. This program focuses on the study of trends and events in the world, and how to anticipate and prepare for them. Courses in this program include “Futures Thinking”, “Futures Analysis” and “Futures and Society”.

5. University of Washington

The University of Washington offers an undergraduate Minor in Futurism. This program focuses on the study of technological, social and environmental change, and how to anticipate and prepare for these changes. Courses in this program include “Futures Thinking and Practice”, “Futures and the Environment”, and “Futures and Society”.

These five universities offer excellent undergraduate programs in futurology. With their help, students can gain the skills and knowledge to become successful futurists and help shape the future.

I’m sure I missed some great future studies educational programs out there. Which ones did I miss?
(add them in the comments)

Bottom line: Futurology is not fortune telling. Futurists use a scientific approach to create their deliverables, but a methodology and tools like those in FutureHacking™ can empower anyone to engage in futurology themselves.

Image credit: Pixabay

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Difference Between Possible, Potential and Preferred Futures

Difference Between Possible, Potential and Preferred Futures

GUEST POST from Art Inteligencia

The role of possible, potential and preferred futures is an often-discussed topic within the field of futures studies. Futures studies, also known as “foresight”, is an interdisciplinary field of study focused on understanding and anticipating the future. Within the field, there are three distinct concepts of the future – possible, potential and preferred futures – each with their own distinct roles and implications.

Possible futures are those that are considered to be theoretically feasible and within the realm of reality. These futures are often explored through scenario planning, a technique used to identify possible future states and their potential consequences. Possible futures are important to consider as they provide a starting point for deeper exploration and analysis.

Potential futures are those that are considered to be likely to happen, based on current trends and technological developments. Potential futures are important to consider as they provide an indication of what is likely to happen in the future and can be used to inform decisions and strategies.

Preferred futures are those that are desired, often based on values, visions and goals. Preferred futures are important as they act as a guiding light for decision-making and help to ensure that actions are taken in line with desired outcomes.

The role of possible, potential and preferred futures is to provide a comprehensive view of the future, and to enable informed decision-making and strategy development. By exploring the potential implications of each type of future, it is possible to gain a better understanding of the future and make decisions accordingly.

Bottom line: Futurology is not fortune telling. Futurists use a scientific approach to create their deliverables, but a methodology and tools like those in FutureHacking™ can empower anyone to engage in futurology themselves.

Image credit: Pixabay

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